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Latest Touring Route!

>> Drive to Cameron Corner? From Broken Hill, two great adventures await! Sturt's Route or Along the Dingo Fence.

>> Discover the beauty & history of the Barmah-Millewa Forest and Murray River along the Timber Cutters Run.

>> With Broken Hill as your base, the NEW Watershed Loop connects the Darling River to the Corner Country.


NEW: Download the Best touring route Maps & Guides

The key to experiencing the richly diverse history and natural heritage of Outback New South Wales is to experience the drives that connect across the region. The most significant of these is Sturt's Steps Touring, a driving route that approximates the journey taken by Charles Sturt in 1845.

Beginning at either Broken Hill or Cameron Corner the route takes in Stationstay properties as well as Milparinka and Tibooburra along its path. It is a journey not to be rushed, but rather experienced, as the landscape changes, the wildlife and flora vary, and one meets a few local characters along the way.

The Silver City Highway to Broken Hill and the White Cliffs Road to Wilcannia follow the traditional routes of Cobb and Co and Morrison Bros, linking the Corner Country with other locations within Outback New South Wales.

Linking Tibooburra to Wanaaring and Bourke is the "cut-line", the route of the original telegraph line and once proposed rail link to the Corner Country. It was also a major travelling stock route in the day when livestock was walked to the market and needed regularly located public watering places.

For those travelling the Darling River Run that links Walgett to Wentworth following the course of the Darling River, there are some great side-trips that includes the iconic touring routes of the Corner Country; especially the Corner Explorer touring route.


Safe Outback Travel

Driving Outback Australia

Safe Outback Travel

The Outback is easily accessible and a safe place to travel. Like any journey, correct planning, preparation and common sense will ensure a memorable and wonderful experience.

Safe outback travel is about common sense and potential dangers come from the hot & dry summers and distances between towns & services.

The Outback experiences very hot and dry summers. Travel is safer and more enjoyable March – October.

The best advice for any traveller is.. “it is better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it