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Paroo-Darling National Park, Outback New South Wales

Paroo-Darling National Park has a rich history with many experiences for the visitor including kayaking, canoeing, fishing and picnicking.

At Paroo-Darling National Park, you’ll find the Paroo Overflow, the only unregulated river in the Murray-Darling Basin and an area of outstanding conservation value and natural beauty.

Spend a couple of days exploring the park, including the ephemeral Peery Lake just northwest of White Cliffs where you'll be amazed by the birdlife - 60,000 birds were recorded in a recent survey.

There are heaps of informal spots for a picnic - choose your own scenic place - and camping is available at Coach and Horse campground in the Wilga section of the park. Be sure to bring your fishing rod along to this popular fishing spot.

With its frequent floods, this area is also the traditional home to the Ngiyeempaa and Paakantyi people and since European settlement has been an important pastoral area. The area’s rich history is waiting for you to discover.

Paroo-Darling National Park Visitor Information:

  • Paroo-Darling See & Do...

    • Paroo-Darling Visitor Centre
    • White Cliffs
    • Peery Lake
    • Coaches & Horses Camp Ground

    Paroo-Darling Information Centre:

    • Park Office (Broken Hill): 183 Argent Street, Broken Hill, New South Wales
    • Park Office (White Cliffs): Keraro Road, White Cliffs, New South Wales
    • Website: Paroo-Darling NP
    • Telephone 08 80913308

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Safe Outback Travel

Driving Outback Australia

Safe Outback Travel

The Outback is easily accessible and a safe place to travel. Like any journey, correct planning, preparation and common sense will ensure a memorable and wonderful experience.

Safe outback travel is about common sense and potential dangers come from the hot & dry summers and distances between towns & services.

The Outback experiences very hot and dry summers. Travel is safer and more enjoyable March – October.

The best advice for any traveller is.. “it is better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it